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5 Ways To Reduce Stress If All You Can Think About Is Coronavirus

Escaping the news and the general anxiety that comes with it can be challenging. Here are 5 things you can do to make this situation better.

Stress affects thousands of people on a daily basis, damaging their quality of life and tampering with their health. In the midst of a pandemic, stress gets ramped up exponentially, making an already dangerous issue an even more distressing one.

Stress is associated with dozens of diseases such as heart conditions, diabetes, depression, anxiety, and so much more. Being stressed out is also a bummer, so it’s important to find things to do that can help you manage you condition, no matter where you are and its level of intensity.

Check out these 5 tips that can help you cope with your stress and improve your daily life:

Deep breaths

Taking three deep breaths every time you feel stressed out or before you sit down to do some work sounds pretty silly, but if you make a habit of it, it can do wonders for your stress. Deep breaths are a part of practically every de-stressing practice, like yoga and meditation. A study from Massachusetts’s General Hospital proves that these kinds of activities are extremely important when it comes to stress management.

Meditation

Mediation
Photo by kosal ley via Unsplash

Meditation has been slowly making its way into the mainstream, with thousands of people using it as a tool for relaxation and a way of obtaining some much needed perspective. Is there a better time to pick up this habit than now, when you have all of this free time on your hands (when they’re not being washed)?

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You can start out slow by reading a little bit about the basics of meditation or downloading an app like Headspace, which includes free guided meditations that orient you through the process with some really cute animations.

Unplug from the news and your job

Stress can come from all sorts of sources, from your job to your tv screen. Right now, it’s extremely important to limit your access to the news and social media. While it’s especially important to stay informed nowadays, you can limit your news access to two or three times a day, ensuring you don’t spend more time than necessary exposing yourself to distressing information.

Watch & read different kinds of stuff

Photo by mohamed_hassan via Pixabay

RELATED: What Exactly Does Self-Quarantine Mean?

If you’re social-distancing or self-isolating, you have plenty of time on your hands. Make sure to use this time wisely, by watching or reading stuff you’d normally avoid. Take this opportunity to start reading a book you’ve been putting off or watching a TV show you’ve never had the time or energy to invest in. People all over the web are coming up with quarantine book clubs and other types of virtual gatherings that can make this experience more communal and special.

Exercise

Whether choosing or being forced to stay indoors, it’s extremely important to remain active. Adding exercise to your routine will build up your immune system, keep you healthy and give you a much needed rush of dopamine. Currently, there are hundreds of apps out there that can walk you through guided workouts for free. These at-home routines are different than what people who run outdoors or regularly visit the gym are used to. With virtual workouts, not only do you need less equipment, but you’ll likely use new muscles and push your body in ways that differ from what you’re used to.

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