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Home Daily Delight How A PB&J Sandwich Helped Catch A Thief In Wyoming

How A PB&J Sandwich Helped Catch A Thief In Wyoming

Eating on the job is now, for better or worse, an American tradition. Very few people actually take real breaks for their midday meal, instead preferring to eat at their desk or work site. While there are obvious upsides to this—you’re, in theory, more productive, you appear to be a dedicated worker, etc.—there are also downsides, as 26-year-old Zachary Munoz.

Cheyenne, Wyoming police claim a half-eaten peanut butter and jelly sandwich and a few cups of coffee tie Munoz to at least a half dozen robberies. The Wyoming Tribute Eagle reports that local cops have even taken to calling him the “PB&J burglar,” which is harsh if fair.

According to police, someone broke into 4 Rivers Equipment three times in September, taking power tools and equipment each time. The only substantive evidence left behind was apparently the partially-devoured PB&J, which police tested for DNA. Munoz was later determined to be a match. From the Tribute Eagle:

The State Crime Lab notified police Oct. 21 that there was no match for the DNA on the peanut butter and jelly sandwich in the state database.

On Nov. 5, though, the detective found out that the DNA matched DNA in the Colorado Bureau of Investigation’s database, and it was that of Munoz.

But the sandwich isn’t the only thing Munoz is alleged to have carelessly discarded at a crime scene. Cops also say the 26-year-old left behind a coffee cup at a JC Penny, which he allegedly robbed three times earlier this year.

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