5 Brilliant Marijuana Business Ideas Killed By Regulations

Bureaucratic red tape and onerous rules are stifling innovation in cannabis industry.

Marijuana Business Ideas
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Though we very much want states  to follow the federal government’s “robust regulation” directives in the 2013 Cole Memo, we can’t help but bemoan when “robust” state cannabis regulations take the fun and creativity out of marijuana business ideas.


Over the years, clients and potential clients have come to the cannabis lawyers at my firm with a bevy of business proposals that in federally lawful world would make sense and probably even be profitable. Unfortunately, we have to nix most of the “creative” business models and product proposals we see in California, Washington, and Oregon (the cannabis states in which we have our offices and in which our lawyers do most of their work) because these states rarely tolerate or permit unique business models or ideas.

In the spirit of the innovation that we have had to quash, the below are the five best/most interesting business proposals killed (or suffering a slow death) from comprehensive cannabis business regulation:

  1. Delivery. It’s a small miracle when a state allows cannabis delivery to customers by dispensaries. And even those few states that permit this typically put it under such serious restrictions you’d think the driver is moving millions in gold or a high level federal prisoner. Washington State doesn’t allow delivery, which helps the illegal market there. Oregon didn’t permit home delivery by retailers until February of this year. Even California’s proposed MCRSA retailer regulations (which will be withdrawn in full, but probably re-issued in similar form in the near future) restrict deliveries to retail licensees that have complied with a massive amount of security procedures.
  2. Fresh food manufacturing and manufacturing certain other products. States do not generally like cannabis manufacturers processing fresh foods or potentially hazardous foods or foods that might appeal to kids. The list of prohibited products varies by state, but the following fresh food items nearly always make the list: heated food, refrigerated food, anything with alcohol for drinking, pies, fruits, vegetable butters, dairy products, meats and seafoods. California planned to ban caffeinated products in its draft MCRSA manufacturer rules. And good luck trying to find any legally sold cannabis-infused gummy candies (or really any traditional candies other than chocolate and fruit chews) in California, Oregon or Washington.
  3. Cannabis events. We’ve previously written about how state cannabis regulations tend to be the death knell for the kinds of cannabis events that were immensely popular just a few years ago. Many states prohibit any gifting of cannabis and that has led to far fewer cannabis cups and cannabis parties.
  4. Marijuana online exchanges and marketplaces. Cannabis-legal states just aren’t ready for cannabis businesses to sell online or through exchanges of any kind. Whether it’s because of a lack of transparency or trust, or just the potential logistical nightmares, states pretty much force in-person transactions within the cannabis chain of distribution, all the way down to the consumer. California may be the one hope here since MAUCRSA retailers can use “technology platforms” they own and control for customer deliveries.
  5. On-site consumption and branded merchandise. No state allows public consumption of cannabis and most also prohibit their cannabis licensees from selling branded merchandise. Though some cities (Denver and Portland) have made a push for social, on-site consumption, most states loathe this as well, which is a real shame since consuming with others in a social setting normalizes cannabis and would likely boost tourism. California is another bright spot here as MAUCRSA will allow for consuming cannabis on the premises of retailers and micro-businesses, but only if the cities and counties in which those businesses sit also allow for this. As far as sales of branded merchandise, the majority of states prohibit cannabis businesses from selling any branded merch. from their licensed premises. For example, Washington State bans that practice (but Oregon does not). California is trying to take it a step further by stopping the sale of all branded merchandise by any cannabis businesses whatsoever.

About Hilary Bricken: Hilary Bricken is an attorney at Harris Bricken, PLLC in Seattle and she chairs the firm’s Canna Law Group. Her practice consists of representing marijuana businesses of all sizes in multiple states on matters relating to licensing, corporate formation and contracts, commercial litigation, and intellectual property. Named one of the 100 most influential people in the cannabis industry in 2014, Hilary is also lead editor of the Canna Law Blog. You can reach her by email at hilary@harrisbricken.com.


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