Home Cannabis Why You'll Never See Kevin Smith Wear His Iconic Hockey Jerseys Again

Why You’ll Never See Kevin Smith Wear His Iconic Hockey Jerseys Again

If asked to create a mental image of Kevin Smith, you’d likely picture him wearing one of his giant hockey jerseys with his “Fatman” podcast logo. But following the massive heart attack Smith suffered last year—in which marijuana might have saved his life—he has since lost a ton of weight, rendering most of his clothing, hockey jerseys included, too big.

Yes, Kevin Smith is retiring his iconic baggywear that defined his look for so long. Smith made the announcement following a segment on Bill Maher’s Real Time program, where Maher doubled down on his criticisms of comic book fans, while making Smith and his hockey jerseys a punchline. To his credit, Smith took it all in stride.

Comic book artist Joe Quesada, a legend in his own right, also came to the defense of Smith and comic fans everywhere. In a Twitter thread deconstructing Maher’s mean-spirited takedown, Quesada started by acknowledging the healthy evolution Smith has undergone.

RELATED: Kevin Smith’s Doctors Say Marijuana Saved Him From Heart Attack

“I’ve watched @billmaher from time to time, been in the audience as well. I don’t agree with everything he says, I don’t always find him funny and no one’s happier than me that @ThatKevinSmith is done with those damn hockey jerseys (m’boy’s looking sexy these days),” Quesada tweeted.

Then came the shock no one expected.

Don’t worry, true believers, Kevin Smith is doing just fine otherwise. In fact, he’s “pleased as a pot-head to announce that the good folks at SABAN and UNIVERSAL have given the green light” to the Jay and Silent Bob reboot. Shooting will begin on February 25, the one-year anniversary of Smith’s heart attack.

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