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5 Therapy Apps When You Need To Talk To An Expert

Apps have thrived in the mental health space, especially during the pandemic. Here are different options that range in prices and functionality.

Navigating the mental health system is no easy feat. Throw in a pandemic and things grow a little more digital and way more complicated. Luckily, there are apps out there working hard to connect you with experts in ways that are faster and much less expensive than a traditional therapy session.

These options provide different kinds of digital connections, whether they’re through texting, crisis lines, or talk therapy apps. Although there’s not much data out there on how effective these apps actually are, they’re an efficient way of speaking with a professional, especially if you find yourself in a crisis and need some help.

Here are 5 apps you can start using right now:

Talkspace

This app offers a variety of different plans ranging from $65-$99 a week that include everything from low-key text options to more involved video sessions and direct connections to mental health experts. Talkspace provides different tools, such as a progress tracker and exercises to develop coping skills.

7 Cups 

5 Therapy Apps You Can Use When You Need To Talk To An Expert
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7 Cups is another paid app that connects you with experts and volunteers. By filling out a questionnaire where you address which topics you’d like to answer, the app asks you if you’d like to be connected with a listener or a therapist, and things move from there. Membership is $150 per month.

What’s Up

What’s Up is one of the few apps that is free to use, suggesting different methods for coping with depression, anxiety, and more, all following Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT) techniques. The app features a tracker for positive and negative behaviors and page that helps you spot and recognize your thinking patterns.

Mood Kit

5 ways to find more affordable therapy
Photo by Kelly Sikkema via Unsplash

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Mood Kit is another app for mild symptoms of depression and anxiety. It follows CBT, and comes with more than 200 mood improvement activity recommendations. It’s a good app for practicing self-care whether you’re feeling down or are simply looking to work on improving your personal habits.

notOK

This app was developed by a struggling teen and his brother and features a big red button that you can press and alarm your friends and loved ones that you need their help. Users can select up to five contacts to be a part of their support group. These contacts will receive the emergency message and a GPS location of the user’s phone.

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