Pesticide Poisoning Fears Result In First Recreational Marijuana Recall In Oregon

Oversight is key to the process, and it's protecting consumers.

Pesticides In Marijuana
Photo by Flickr user jetsandzeppelins

The first-ever recreational marijuana recall was issued earlier this week in Oregon after a specific brand tested positive for high amounts of pesticide residue, reports Capital Press.

On Monday, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC), which monitors the state’s recreational pot market, announced a recall of “Blue Magoo” after samples of the herb sold at Buds 4 U in Mapleton, located just outside Eugene, did not pass the pesticide testing protocol outlined under state law.

Based on the state’s tracking system, the retailer sold the tainted product to 31 customers during March 8-10. Anyone who purchased this strain from the retailer is urged to either return it or throw it away.


The retailer immediately informed the commission of the problem once it discovered the product violated safety standards. A spokesperson for the OLCC said the folks at Buds 4 U earned a “gold star” for their willingness to cooperate with respect to this issue.It seems the wholesaler (Cascade Cannabis Distributing) simply failed to test the product, which was grown by Emerald Wave Estate in Creswell, before allowing it to move forward for retail sale, the report shows.

According to a study published in the Journal of Toxicology, “the portion of pesticide recovery is alarmingly high” in cannabis products “and is a serious concern.” These chemicals have the potential to make it into a person’s bloodstream and can contribute to a wealth of serious health problems, especially in patients who use the herb for medicinal function.

Pesticide residue “can pose substantial threats to immuno-compromised patients or patients with other conditions, such as diseases of the liver, that may intensify the toxicological effects of pesticide exposure,” the study shows.

But strangely, no one really knows just how much of these dangerous chemicals are actually toxic.

For now, the remaining nine pounds of Blue Magoo has been set aside until it is determined safe for consumption under the guidelines of the state.

But the foul up could lead to penalties.

A first offense comes with the potential of a $1,650 fine and 10 days business closure. Any further issues (four within a year) could cause these businesses to lose their licenses.


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