Friday, April 19, 2024

Is Resin A Good Replacement For Marijuana

The thing to keep in mind is that resin is just tar, ash and burnt carbon that just so happens to have some THC trapped inside.

Things happen and you suddenly have no more stash, is resin a good replacement for marijuana.  As times could get hard in some parts of the United States, specifically in areas of prohibition or in places that may opt to include dispensaries in the next wave of closures. After all, desperate times call for desperate measures, and these are about as desperate of times the nation has seen in over 100 years. But, in looking to the dark days ahead, can these resin hits really work to curb the stoner appetite when supplies go dry? 

RELATED: NORML Gives Marijuana Consumption Safety Guidelines During Coronavirus Outbreak

Resin was once the last resort when the person who ventured out to score a bag of weed came home empty-handed. It’s that black, sticky and, let’s face it, gross, tar-like substance that builds up in our pipes and bongs over time. Most cannabis users make it a point to clean this stuff out of their smoking devices on occasion to ensure the collected residue isn’t clogging up the air flow or making their weed taste bad. 

But some marijuana users, admittedly the more desperate of the breed, have been known to scrape out the resin from their paraphernalia and either smoke it right then and there or save it back for a rainy day.   

How Often Should You Change Your Bong Water?
Photo by vladans/Getty Images

We’re not going to mince words, resin is the bologna sandwich of the cannabis scene. Yet, in a pinch, resin hits, in all of their disgusting glory, can be used to get the despaired user high to some degree. Although most of the THC burns up as soon as marijuana is held to a flame, some residual is always collected in the resin. So while some old-time stoners might swear on a stack of Bibles that resin hits get them higher than a Tibetan monk, the truth is this crud only contains small amounts of the stoner compound. Sure, smoking it might get the doobie desperado high, but it is more likely to give them a splitting headache than anything that resembles pleasure. 

Resin hits also taste awful. But more than just their foul flavor, they are about as unhealthy as it gets. We all know by now that just burning plant matter like the Gods intended is not the healthiest choice when it comes to consuming marijuana. But the cannabis user who relies on resin hits to get high during the Coronapocalypse is at serious risk of respiratory issues — something that’s probably not a good idea considering that’s the part of the body this virus likes to target. 

RELATED: What Is Hash And Why Is It Making A Comeback?

The thing to keep in mind is that resin is just tar, ash and burnt carbon that just so happens to have some THC trapped inside. It’s the foul demon of marijuana past. It resembles the plant only slightly in effect, but does more harm than good. And while smoking resin every so often is not considered dangerous, doing it regularly could inevitably bring about unwanted health problems.

Our advice is to stock up now on all of your favorite cannabis products while you still have time, or you could always learn the art of home cultivation. There is just no telling how deep of a pit this coronavirus is going to drive the nation into before it is over. It is always better to be prepared than empty handed, especially when those empty hands are reduced to scraping out bong resin.

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